1/26/2016

The Style Problem for Artists

I have been fortunate enough to support my family as a freelance illustrator for the past decade and I have seen my business grow with each passing year. But when I stop to think about one of the biggest secrets for my staying power in a famously shaky business, I am frequently wary of sharing it with students or new artists in my profession. Why? Because it goes against what nearly every working artist or teacher advises young artists to do, if they want to be ‘successful.’ I’m talking about style consistency.

I strongly believe that my illustration business thrives on offering clients a range of visual styles in which I can work confidently. In school, through books, and at illustration conferences, I was instructed to create a portfolio in a singular style and with a consistent “voice” so that art directors could easily understand how I would approach an assignment. This makes perfect sense, and I see the logic in this instruction. However, I was never happy drawing only one way, and I suspect most artists feel the same. Sometimes you want to be quick and messy, and sometimes you want to be slow and steady. Sometimes it’s all about shapes, and other times, it’s about line, or perhaps texture or color. Or sometimes, and perhaps most importantly, you just get incredibly bored with the same old thing.

So when I was ready to start my own business, I created a website for my illustration work and put stylistically varied images in the gallery, against the advice of peers and instructors. At first, there were only three distinctly different looks to the samples of work I shared. However, given what I had been told about the importance of style consistency, this already felt daring and dangerous. Would art directors decide that I was reckless and not dependable? Or fickle? Flighty?...more